suicide prevention

All Hands on Deck: How We Can Help Someone Who’s Suicidal

The whole world has felt the impact of recent reports about suicide. The suicide rate in the U.S. military reached one a day this year, meaning more U.S. forces died by suicide than in combat in Afghanistan. A U.K. study published earlier this month showed 1,000 suicides to be linked to rising unemployment and the… Read more »

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The Inner Voice that Drives Suicide

Understanding a person in suicidal crisis One in five therapists has a patient who completes suicide. Understanding and preventing suicide is therefore one of the most frightening and important responsibilities of anyone who works as a psychologist or counselor. To treat suicidal patients, a therapist must understand what is going on in the mind of… Read more »

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The Price of Being Strong: Risks to the Mental Health of Athletes

Although the London Games are over, the rush of the Olympic “spirit” still lingers in the air. It’s always inspiring to watch the world come together to celebrate athletes who’ve managed to excel, push their bodies to their maximum potential, and compete at the highest level. The Olympic motto spells our expectations out most simply,… Read more »

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The Link Between LGBT Youth, Bullying, and Suicide

In 1989, when the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released a public report stating that up to a third of all teen suicides were committed by gay youth, there was a flurry of media attention and speculation surrounding the rising rates of teen suicide committed by Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered youth. It… Read more »

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Suicide: The Warning Signs

Suicide has been recently described as an “epidemic.” With tragedies associated with the current financial crisis and the increasing suicide rate of military personnel, a need clearly exists for more extensive training in the management and treatment of suicidal clients. It is the most common clinical emergency therapists face, yet many do not receive formal training…. Read more »

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Suicide on the Rise – What We Do by Lisa Firestone, Ph.D.

Can we identify people who are at high risk for ending their own lives and get them the help they need? The answer is Yes. We can. It is now possible to more accurately spot these individuals and effectively intervene than it has ever been. This hopeful answer is especially important today in the wake… Read more »

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Busting the Myths About Suicide

There are many commonly held beliefs about suicide that keep us from trying to help people at risk. Here are some of the typical misconceptions about suicide that are NOT true: Most suicides are caused by one particular trigger event. A person who attempts suicide has to feel bad about themselves for a long period… Read more »

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Teen Suicide Prevention: Concerned Friends and Family

Helping Friends Who May Be Suicidal If you have a friend who is distressed, depressed or unusually troubled by family problems, bad grades, or recent breakup of a relationship, don’t be afraid to ask if he or she would like to talk with you. Listen with empathy, ask directly about any suicidal thoughts or plans,… Read more »

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Teen Suicide Prevention: Teachers and Educators

The Role of Teachers in Preventing Suicide As a teacher you are in the position to reach out to student at risk for suicide Youth suicides, or suicide attempts, rarely take place in schools, but many young people who are at risk of suicide attend school and exhibit warning signs.  When teachers recognize theses signs… Read more »

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Teen Suicide Prevention: Parents

Suicide is the third leading cause of death among youth between 14 and 24 years of age and the fourth leading cause of death for those aged 10-14. However,  suicide can be prevented. It is important to know the warning signs in young people who may be contemplating taking their own lives. Be sure to… Read more »

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