On-Demand Webinars

The Power of Forgiveness: A Conversation with Dr. Frederic Luskin

 

 

In this Webinar: 

The importance of practicing forgiveness has always been extolled in both religious and psychological traditions.  Dr. Luskin’s research has confirmed its virtues in the promotion of psychological, relationship and physical health.  Forgiveness has been shown to reduce anger, hurt, depression and stress and lead to greater feelings of optimism, hope, compassion and self-confidence.

Dr. Luskin’s work explores forgiveness with the goal of reducing hurt and helplessness, letting go of anger and increasing confidence. He will explore the HEAL process of forgiveness that, when learned, can lead to enhanced well-being through self-care.

Dr. Luskin holds a Ph.D. in Counseling and Health Psychology from Stanford University. He continues to serve as Director of the Stanford Forgiveness Projects, an ongoing series of workshops and research projects that investigate the effectiveness of his forgiveness methods on a variety of populations. The forgiveness project has successfully explored forgiveness therapy with people who suffered from the violence in Northern Ireland, Sierra Leone as well as the attacks on the World Trade Center on 9/11. In addition his work has been successfully applied and researched in corporate, medical, legal and religious settings. He currently serves as a Senior Consultant in Health Promotion at Stanford University and is a Professor at the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the mind body link in forgiveness.
  2. Apply a definition of forgiveness that will enhance practice.
  3. Utilize guided practice in two simple techniques that facilitate forgiveness.

To learn more about Dr Luskin’s work visit http://learningtoforgive.com/

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Ordering Information:

Once payment is received, you will be e-mailed a full video recording of this Webinar along with all presentation materials.

Optional CEs (3) may be purchased through R. Cassidy Seminars for $15. A link to purchase CE credits will be included in the email containing all your Webinar resources. More Info Here

Continuing Education Information

Optional CEs (3) may be purchased through R. Cassidy Seminars for $15. A link to purchase CE credits will be included in the email containing all your Webinar resources. More Info Here

This event is co-sponsored by R. Cassidy Seminars.  A link to purchase CE credits will be provided to all Webinar registrants.

Satisfactory Completion

Participants must have paid tuition fee, signed in, attended the entire seminar, completed any accompanying reading assignment, completed an evaluation, and signed out in order to receive a certificate. Failure to sign in or out will result in forfeiture of credit for the entire course. No exceptions will be made. Partial credit is not available.

Psychologists

Cassidy Seminars is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to offer continuing education for psychologists. R. Cassidy Seminars maintains responsibility for this program. 3

Social Workers

Cassidy Seminars, ACE provider #1082 is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org, through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) Program. Approval Period: April 15, 2012-April 15, 2015. R. Cassidy Seminars maintains responsibility for the program. Social workers should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval. Social workers will receive 3 continuing education (clinical, social work ethics) clock hours in participating in this course.

Please Note: Licensing Boards change regulations often and while we attempt to stay abreast of their most recent changes, if you have questions or concerns about this course meeting your specific board’s approval, we recommend you contact your board directly to obtain a ruling.

Note: Many state boards accept offerings accredited by national or other state organizations. If your state is not listed, please check with your professional licensing board to determine whether the accreditations listed are accepted.

About the Presenter

Frederic Luskin, Ph.D. Frederic Luskin, PhD, is director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Project, director of wellness education at Stanford University, and professor of clinical psychology at Sofia University. He is author of Stress Free for Good, Forgive for Good, and Forgive for Love.Luskin is renowned for teaching about the psychological and medical benefits of forgiveness. Research done by Luskin and others has confirmed that forgiveness can reduce anger, depression, and stress while it leads to greater feelings of optimism, hope, compassion, and self-confidence.As director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Project, Luskin conducts an ongoing series of workshops and research projects that investigate the effectiveness of his forgiveness methods on a variety of populations. The forgiveness project has explored forgiveness therapy with people who suffered from the violence in Northern Ireland and Sierra Leone, as well as from the attacks on the World Trade Center September 11, 2001. In addition, his work has been successfully applied and researched in corporate, medical, legal, and religious settings.Luskin’s work has been featured in Time; O, The Oprah Magazine; Ladies' Home Journal; US News & World Report; Parade; Prevention; the New York Times; the Los Angeles Times; the Chicago Tribune; USA Today; and the Wall Street Journal.Luskin is also a professor at the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology.He offers lectures, workshops, seminars, and trainings nationwide on forgiveness, stress management, and emotional competence.

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3 Comments

Sapato Veronica

this is really great but I want to know how can I also teach m friends to forgive. I’m undergraduate student at Kwame Nkrumah university of Science and Technology offering social work in my second year.

Reply
Yana

Forgiveness has been one of the hardest things for me to do.

I had a very difficult early childhood, and even though I have someone in my life that loves me unconditionally, it’s like part of me says NO! I will not let go! I will not let the past go. SOMEONE has to suffer for my pain, for what they did to me.

And in the end, it is true, I am the only one that suffers. You are right Dr. Firestone.

It is so hard to forgive. I also think some people actually in a weird way, hold onto their past as a form of identity, as well as in order not to happy, hence they don’t want to forgive. Also, I would say with forgiveness comes much loss often. It is easier to say that guy/girl was such an asshole! They deserve punishment. Rather than forgive and think, “Oh…That person must have been really hurting or disturbed to have done that to me.” Or like Jesus said, “They know not what they do.”

So hard to do….People who forgive after horrific events are very courageous and dedicated to their happiness in my eyes.

Thanks.

Yana

Reply
Anji

Some people find it helpful to write a letter to the person that caused them pain. List everything you feel they did to you. Get it all off your chest. But don’t post it. You can burn it as an act of letting it go or just put it away somewhere where you can forget about it so it’s not eating away at you but it is documented and not just brushed under the carpet. I often hear of people who have behaved badly eventually falling on hard times which they have brought about by themselves. As my daughter always says “karma”

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