Maureen Sullivan

Maureen Sullivan
Maureen Sullivan is a writer for PsychAlive and has been on the staff of The Glendon Association, a nonprofit that promotes mental health education, since 2003. A lifelong dancer and spiritual explorer, Maureen identifies healing as her purpose.  In addition to writing, filmmaking and expressing through visual and performing arts, Maureen has studied psychology, nutrition, mediation, mindfulness and other modalities as means to generate personal, family and community healing.  She is a social justice political activist and is currently completing a BA in Creative Writing/Screenwriting from Southern New Hampshire University.

Blogs by Maureen Sullivan

The Reason Why Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Gets it Right on Suicide Prevention (and ’13 Reasons Why’ is Harmfully Misguided)

Rebecca Bunch, the endearingly narcissistic protagonist of the CW comedy Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, is a singing/dancing, self-sabotaging feminist hero. But did you know that in addition to provoking laughter, entertainment and intellectual stimulation, the writers of this show are also providing valuable and potentially life-saving mental health content to their viewers? If you haven’t seen the… Read more »

Learn More

Helping Children Thrive: How I Spoke Up for One Little Girl

When I first met Rikki in the parking lot of a Motel 6, she effortlessly captured my heart. I had actually started to care about her even before that first meeting. As a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteer preparing for my first case, I had read Rikki’s file. I knew she was 10, she… Read more »

Learn More

Commitment Issues: Why Some People Have Them and Others Don’t

Adam is smart, talented and attractive. He’s successful in business and has an exciting lifestyle. He’s a winner, everyone agrees…except his ex-girlfriends. Any one of them can tell a story about Adam that includes disappointment or betrayal. Adam is not malicious. Like anyone else, he wants intimacy… but only so much. If things get too… Read more »

Learn More

Compulsive Liars: The Truth About Lying

“You’re a despicable liar!” These words, shouted by my 11-year-old cousin, John, were etched into my mind some forty years ago. Not because they stung, but because I was so struck by John’s impressive use of the word “despicable,” and the dramatic flair with which he hurled it at me. I distinctly remember that I… Read more »

Learn More

Confessions of a (Narrow-Minded?!) Liberal: Using Friendship to Bridge the Political Divide

Chad (not his real name) and I dated in high school. Now we’re friends on Facebook. We do the normal Facebook things, like sending happy birthday wishes, sharing and commenting on cute old photos, and retelling funny stories from the carefree days of youth. Everything was going fine, until… Election 2016. In the last year,… Read more »

Learn More

The Sweet Spot: Relief from the Fear of Death through Mindfulness

If you have ever lain awake in the middle of the night pondering death, heart racing, icy hot fear coursing through your body as your mind tries desperately to find solid ground, you are not alone. Let me say that again: You are not alone. On the most basic level, you are not alone, because… Read more »

Learn More

Empathy: How It Can Help Us All Right Now

In the aftermath of the most contentious election in recent history, many people are talking about the need for empathy in order to heal our divided nation. Facebook posts are flying around that charge us to rise above the rancor and offer empathy to those with whom we disagree. Just recently, Meryl Streep spoke to… Read more »

Learn More

Living Mom’s Life?

“I think I want to be good.”  A warm tear rolls down my cheek.  My ten-year-old and I are watching the climactic scene of Descendants, a new movie from Disney Channel.  The girl uttering this revelation is Mal, daughter of Maleficent.  She is speaking to the boy who loves her. In this lighthearted movie, which… Read more »

Learn More

What Inside Out Can Teach us about Loving our Kids

The other day I recommended the movie Inside Out to my friend, Cynthia, as an intervention. Her favorite niece, Emily, is going through puberty. The sweet little girl who used to love shopping and doing craft projects with her aunt, is now moody and not interested in sharing those activities. Cynthia feels hurt about this… Read more »

Learn More